All students in Year 9 have been given some revision tasks for an assessment for their expedition ‘You give me fever’.

This assessment will take place on Monday 10th May for Pioneer and Tuesday 11th May for Explorer.

Students have been asked to join Seneca to revisit their learning, and have been given access to textbooks as well as their regular quizzing in Tassomai.

The assessment will be on the following:

Cell Biology

Plant organisation

Infection and response

E25/X25 Year 9 Common Mission

Year 9 Common Mission 


Purpose

To explain how we use Common Mission to support students to access different pathways to academic, career and life readiness at XP. Common Mission is a curriculum process that is additional to our Core GCSEs, where we further develop character and positive habits of work and learning in our students.¬† In addition to our Core GCSEs, we run one session a week from Year 9 called ‚ÄėCommon Mission‚Äô. These sessions allow students to think about, prepare and take qualifications in pathways that will help them to become who they want to be later in life. Common Mission sessions include career and further education advice, as well as time for them to study a GCSE of their choice if they have the motivation, capacity and capability to do so.¬† Common Mission includes the opportunity to study a Choice qualification or to pursue other curriculum or personal interests. In these sessions students develop their self-study skills so they are ready for their next steps in the education process.

 

 

X25/E25

On Wednesday the 14th of April, students at X25 and E25 students will choose one of the following common mission options to develop their self-study skills so they are ready for their next steps in the education process, with the potential to gain the listed qualifications. 28th of April will be the start date Your support and guidance as parents will be invaluable to our students making a choice that is right for them. As well as discussions at home, our students will spend time in crew this week. Please see the video below outlining the overview of Common mission. If you have any further questions please do not hesitate use the form attached and I will answer any questions as soon as possible.

 

Topic Options:

 

 

Common mission Option  Potential Qualification Specification
Business Studies GCSE AQA
Engineering NCFE Level 1/2  NCFE
Maths pushing 9.0 Additional Study  GCSE AQA AQA Maths
Music ABRSM  Level 2
Music qualification through the Rock School (RSL)
BTEC PE BTEC Pearson Edexcel
Triple Science GCSE AQA Triple Biol, chem, phys
Psychology GCSE AQA
Dance BTEC BTEC Pearsons Level 2
Geography GCSE AQA
Core Expeditions Additional Study  STEAM, MATHS, HUMAN
Self Study Mix Mix

 

XP Self Study Website Examples:

 

Business Studies

Psychology

Geography

 

 

Have any questions?:

 

 

When we return to school on Monday 22nd March, students in Year 9 will start working on the final product for their learning expedition ‘You give me fever‘, which has the guiding question:

“Why should we care about health inequality?”

The final product will celebrate and honour the work of NHS staff across the whole organisation during this most difficult of years.

 

We would like for small groups of students to speak with NHS workers to find out about their role, and how it has been impacted over this last year.

If you or anyone in your family is an NHS worker, we would really appreciate it if our students could speak to you about your important work.

Ideally we would like for workers to meet with small groups of our students online during Monday 29th – Wednesday 31st March.

 

We are looking for workers from across all of the NHS, and are especially in need of some of the typically unsung heroines and heros such as cleaners, porters or community ambulance drivers for example, although our students would learn a lot from speaking to anyone with a role in the organisation. We have many experts already lined up, but it would be great to get even more from our families at XP.

If you or someone you know can help our students to learn more about the herculean efforts of this past year, please contact Mr Said.

We can’t wait to welcome all of our students back very soon!

msaid@xpeast.org

Within our expeditionary art sessions in Year 9 we would like students to use the Pixlr app to create some digital artwork.
This is a free and fantastic online image editing app. By doing this it will allow all students to work on the same platform regardless of the device being used.

Students need to sign up for an account, however it specifies that users should be over the age of 16. This is a condition of the app creators, however there are no inherent risks in using the software. Essentially it is an online photoshop equivalent.

Could you please complete this short Google Form to let us know if you give permission for your son/daughter to sign up for an account and use the app.

If you have any questions please contact jdoyle@xpschool.org

Thanks as always for your support.

C25: Out here in the fields

Our year 9 students were lucky enough to get out on fieldwork on the final week of term to complete work relating to their ‘Welcome to the machine’ expedition. Over the next seven weeks of the winter term, they will be working on their answer to the guiding question:

‘Do the benefits of industrialisation outweigh the costs?’

For their first STEAM case studies, students have been looking at conservation data, learning about how data can be collected and displayed using multiple representations. They have also been learning about specialisation and ecosystem management.

They visited The Hatfield Moors, our local nature reserve, to examine the extent of the fire damage from earlier this year. Students have been learning about the protected species that can be found at the site, particularly the adder, and how Natural England and the fire service prioritised safeguarding these species during the clear up operation.

While at the site, students conducted a series of sampling techniques, as well as collecting data on the wildlife. Sadly, due to slight delays in being able to visit the site, we weren’t able to spot any adders as they have likely gone into hibernation for the winter, however, students were still able to find other species key to maintaining and supporting the ecosystem at the wetland.

Students also conducted a number of tests on the site, in accordance with their two daily learning targets for the day:

1. I can estimate the population density of a species using random sampling techniques.

Students engaged in data collection of various parts of the site, using quadrats to provide increasingly accurate estimations of species numbers in the areas we sampled. We created a set of axes, used a random number generator to find coordinates to sample, and collected the data from those coordinates.

After collecting data in teams of three, we used all the data collected to calculate the predicted species number, based on scaling up the measurements to accommodate the size of the field. In debrief, due to a large range in answers, we went on to calculate the mean for those estimations, to create a more accurate estimation. We also discussed why using the random number generator was fundamental in keeping our research free from bias.

2. I can investigate the effects of abiotic factors using systematic sampling techniques.

Students then went on to conduct a series of pH tests on the wetlands, again using their quadrats placed along a transect, to link changes in species to abiotic factors of the wetlands. In debrief, we examined the data, looking for patterns relating to the abundance of the plant species and the abiotic factor recorded.

I’d also like to thank our very own Marshall Jones, for taking his time on the day and spare time to create this amazing vlog documenting the day:

I feel incredibly fortunate that we were able to make it out to the site given the current circumstances, and I really look forward to hear how the work the students have done on this series of case studies will inform their guiding question answers over the coming weeks.

Very special visitors to E25 this week

In our case study ‘Snakes on a plain’, we have been learning about the adders at Hatfield Moor and how they have been so successful by occupying a niche in nature as a cold climate snake. In the coming weeks we will look at the fire at Hatfield, most likely caused by careless human action, and how the coordinated response from the Local Authority, Natural England and the Fire Service worked tirelessly to protect this important natural wonder on our doorstep in Doncaster.

To deepen our studies, this week students in E25 welcomed experts from Sam’s Safaris into school. Zoe and Joy brought with them some even more special guests. We met a range of reptiles, amphibians and mammals so that students could learn more about how they are adapted to their environments, how they are dependent upon other species and the impact that humans are having on their ecosystems (both positive and negative).

Some of the brilliant insights we gained into adaptations included the Jacobson’s organ in snakes, and how they are able to ‘taste’ the air. We also learned how chinchillas have adapted to their cold environment by having 60 hairs sprout from each of their follicles compared to just one hair per follicle in humans (or none in the case of some of our more veteran teachers). The mountain kingsnake was a particular favourite, with its bright colours mimicking a venomous coral snake to ward off potential predators.

We also heard about how deforestation – often to clear land for palm oil farms – was having a devastating impact on geckos, and how insecticides were causing damage to microbial ecosystems in the soil.

On a more positive note, our experts described how conservation work was helping to protect species, and how young people are more engaged than ever before in helping to protect the wonders of nature on which we are all entirely dependent.

Our experts were knowledgeable and showed great care towards the animals, helping some students (and staff) to overcome their fears too.

Almost everyone fell in love with Scrabble the chinchilla. Mr Doyle said his favourite was the gerbil though; what’s that about?!?

NEW EXPEDITION ALERT!

On Monday 27th April, Year 8 will be starting a new Hums expedition.

Our previous expedition ‘I’ve Got the Power!’ – didn’t quite end the way we planned it to due to the COVID-19 closures, however, it made me realise that we do have the power – the power to spread or halt the spread of an infectious disease, depending on our behaviour. I thought this image highlighted the ‘power of one’ brilliantly in context of the current situation.

Immersion is one of the most exciting weeks in a new expedition – year 8 will start their Immersion week on Monday where they will have the week to work out the clues to figure out what the new expedition could be about, its title and guiding question. I’m looking forward to seeing their responses and doing a bit of detective work!

I’d like to say a massive thank you and well done to how hard the students have worked in lockdown – I know it brings many challenges in a variety of ways but I really appreciate their dedication and hope this continues into the new expedition. The majority of students managed to complete all their work on time but for any who haven’t this is a message to you:

If you have any work that is not completed from the old expedition (I’ve Got the Power) leave it and start from the Immersion week of the new expedition¬†

This means that all students will start from the same point and it will reduce anxieties about an overwhelming amount of work and the feeling of falling behind.

As with the previous expedition, all work will be set on Google Classroom. Students will receive an assignment of google slides each week. Each weekly assignment contains 4-5 sessions to be completed over the week. The sessions are broken down into different tasks – like with the previous expedition – whenever there is a red task symbol like the one below, there is something for the students to complete.

Each student has a google doc assigned to them on Google Classroom. This doc has the layout of each session and tasks so it is clear for students to organise their work. This doc needs to be submitted once ALL the sessions are completed for that assignment at the end of the week. 

Any questions, email hhickson@xpeast.org

Let the new expedition commence!

E25 Human Work During School Closure

It’s good to see some students already starting their online learning assignments. Here are the instructions on how to complete the work set. This was shared with students in lessons but those who were absent last week will have missed them. They must READ all the instructions on the slides/Google Classroom.

Submitting work 

  • Currently on Google Classroom, there are 2 assignments set. Students need to complete the Geography one FIRST and then the English slides. They should submit the doc on Google classroom once they have got to the end of each slide.¬†

What to complete and when

  • Each set of slides are broken down into ‘lessons’, students need to complete a minimum of a lesson a day or follow the ‘weekly planner’ timetable sent out my Mr Portman each week.
  • Whenever the students see a red ‘TASK’ symbol which looks like the one below they need to complete the activity on their doc.

Layout

  • On the docs, work needs to have the layout of:

           Subject: Geography/English/History

           Lesson Number:

           DLT: 

           Task: 

Students need to write in Quicksand font, size 12.

If you have any questions, email me at hhickson@xpeast.org. I will be checking emails everyday and student work completion – if work is not being done, parents will be contacted.

Thank you!

Medieval Mayhem for E25!

What a fantastic day we had on our fieldwork yesterday with E25. We visited Oakham Castle to experience workshops, role-play and re-enactment specifically tailored to our expedition ‘I’ve Got the Power!’.

We began the day with a walk-through re-enactment of William the Conqueror’s invasion through England, resulting in the Harrying of the North.¬† Needless to say there were some great acting skills showing the death and destruction that William caused.¬† Then, onto the Domesday Book where we analysed data and figured out how the ownership and value of the land changed between 1066 and 1086.

A tug of war game to represent the story and changing power balances during the First and Second Barons’ War where King John, followed by King Henry III battled with their Barons. It was clear to see the complexities and changes in power during the 1200s and each student played an excellent role to tell the story.

Next, we explored the Black Death, Hundred Years War and the Poll Tax which was brilliantly represented through another interactive game. We learnt how these events helped to cause the Peasants Revolt. We met John Ball and Wat Tyler and felt first hand how they inspired and lead the Peasants to challenge the traditional power dynamics – it was absolutely great to see how involved the students got. Who’d have thought they would make such enthusiastic revolting peasants who so passionately rejoiced over the death of the Archbishop of Canterbury (Dylan).

After the excitement of the revolt, we returned to the hall to prepare for a debate – democracy vs. dictatorship. The students used sources to gather information on the two systems of power in order to defend their side – again, fantastic arguments from both sides, with a special mention to Ava who brought examples in from our learning so far this expedition to support her pro-democracy argument.

All in all, a wonderful day – it’s great to have such confident, enthusiastic students!